We Want Facts not Flexible Working

Flexi-hours
Offering special treatment and flexi-hours is not the answer to managing menopause in the workplace. We need education, awareness and - for many of us - HRT, to really make a difference

When Dawn Butler, Shadow Women and Equalities Secretary, announced at the Labour party conference earlier this year that, if elected, Labour would offer flexibility for menopausal women in the workforce, I – a 30-something with no knowledge about the menopause – thought it sounded like a great idea. I’ve been watching women demand, and need, flexibility in order to survive and thrive my whole life. Surely this was just more of the same?

It’s certainly not the first time that I or well-intended party policies have been very wrong because someone didn’t bother to do their homework. 

I thought the menopause was mostly hot flushes, and women carrying fans in their handbags all year round. “I feel like I’m having a hot flush,” women would joke in the office. Somewhere in my head, I knew this was menopausal. That murky connection solidified in the back of my brain, mistakenly turning into fact.So to examine Labour’s proposal, I put it to the experts. In an email from Dr Louise Newson, a GP and menopause specialist, her response is fairly unequivocal. “These women need help, not time off work.”

When we speak, Dr Newson elaborates: “Yes, having time off work is good but actually, as most women can have HRT, it is even better to have their hormones balanced, to be given the right education and support, and the right combination of diet, exercise and wellbeing advice. They can not only stay at work but they can probably do a far better job.

“These women need help, not time off work,” says Dr Louise Newson

“Personally, if I hadn’t managed my menopause, I would not have been working because my brain was gone – my memory was poor, my concentration was poor, my motivation was reduced. So even if I’d had flexible working, with proper management, I would have stayed at home and stared at the four walls. Yet when it is managed probably, women thrive at work”.

Education is the key

Diane Danzebrink is a menopause expert and wellbeing consultant. She started the #MakeMenopauseMatter campaign, including a petition which nearly 90,000 people have signed, demanding better training for GPs, better information in workplaces and education on the menopause being taught in PSHE. 

“I regularly go into workplaces to deliver education sessions on menopause and the questions at the end are generally about treatment options, not how women can change their hours,” she says. “The underlying issue here is a lack of education for the general public and health professionals. This results in women and their employers often not recognising what is happening to them and not knowing what they can do to help themselves.”

This lack of awareness is having serious ramifications for women in the workplace. Research led by Dr Newson found that of the 1132 women she surveyed, over 90% of respondents said their menopausal or perimenopausal symptoms were having a negative impact on their work. Over half said that colleagues had noted a deterioration in their performance. As a result 9% had to go through a disciplinary procedure.

When they did seek help, things were not much better: 37% of women had been provided with a sickness certificate from their doctors, of these 52% had stated anxiety/stress as the cause, with only 7% starting menopause as the reason.

Research from Nuffield Health group has also found that women are confused around HRT, mistakenly denied treatment, and one-third had not been made aware of the treatment by their GP. 

This adds to the frustration that Labour is right to want to help menopausal women, but it too seems to be suffering from the same lack of understanding as the rest of us.

The workplace measures that work

So what can companies do? Jill Ross, Accenture’s managing director for retail in the UK and Ireland organised Accenture’s first ever event on World Menopause Day (October 18) this year. (Full disclosure, the event was in partnership with MPowered Women.) She was the one to “challenge” the company. “I’m in my mid 40s and very aware of the next life stage I’m about to enter,” she says. “Women are working for longer and we have more senior women than ever in the workplace. I thought, how do we start breaking the taboo?” 

Labour is right to want to help menopausal women, but it too seems to be suffering from the same lack of understanding as the rest of us.

The event was a success on a few fronts for Ross; Accenture facing the issue head on and creating “a supportive and informative space for women”, men attending and “a couple of women who attended then went back to their GP to discover what they thought had been anxiety around a new promotion had in fact been menopausal symptoms.”

Dr Newson says it is not unusual for line managers to attend similar menopausal awareness sessions, only to come out and realise that they too have been experiencing symptoms.  

Accenture isn’t alone. Tesco and Channel 4 have begun education and awareness initiatives. And the business incentive is an obvious one; instead of covering the cost of flexible working as Labour have proposed, invest in educating staff to understand symptoms and seek the right treatment. This way the workforce remains productive, surely the shared goal of everyone.

Menopause is a #metoo issue

The lack of education around the menopause and how to treat it is perhaps not that surprising. The taboo around talking about women’s bodies and how they function is a stubborn one – just think of current work to destigmatise periods or the problems of women not having smear tests.  I wonder, therefore, how much menopause falls in the not-so-sweet spot of sexism, and a culturally ingrained disgust or shame around women’s bodies, and ageism.

Instead of covering the cost of flexible working as Labour have proposed, invest in educating staff to understand symptoms and seek the right treatment.

If a menopause signifies the end of a woman’s fertility, is there an antiquated societal hangover that these women are no longer of concern? The menopause embodies all of those prejudices and discriminations. Is it any great surprise, therefore, that medical professionals aren’t as informed as they should be?

Ross says awareness around the menopause is the natural next step in the current conversations in diversity and inclusion. In a #MeToo age, politicians, journalists, business and the wider public are endlessly talking about women at work and redrawing the dynamics what that can, and should, look like. Historically, women have had to hide issues that impact them in the workplace; child care, caring responsibilities, sexual harassment, unequal pay. The menopause is so well hidden that women themselves don’t see it.

As a now better informed 30-something, I only wish these conversations could begin earlier, not just when women are in the grips of what they think is a career-changing anxiety crisis. In this #metoo era, we still have a lot more talking to do.

If you haven’t signed Diane Danzebrink’s #makemenopausematter petition, what are you waiting for? Sign it today and let’s beat this taboo once and for all.


Share this Article

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on pinterest
Share on print
Share on email

About the Author

Join the Community

More In

About the Author

Close Menu
Looking for Answers?